Amending and Revoking Your AD

Amending your Advance Directive


To amend your Advance Directive means to change it.  You can make changes to your AD at any time you have capacity.  Once you have been found to be incapacitated and your AD is turned on, you are not able to make any changes to your AD until you regain capacity.

 

You can make your changes by writing them on your AD, by adding them as an attachment to your AD, or by writing a new form.  ​Anytime that you make changes to any part of your AD, you must make sure that it is: 

  • Signed by you
  • Signed by two adult witnesses
  • Dated so that people can tell which is the most up-to-date version


If you choose to make changes to your AD, it is important to make sure that any “outdated” instructions are clearly crossed-out.  Also, it is very important that you give a copy of your updated Advance Directive to your health care providers because your doctors are not required to follow any changes that they do not know about.  Physicians and agents cannot be held liable for following an Advance Directive that they believe to be correct and valid.



Revoking your Advance Directive


To revoke your Advance Directive means to cancel it.  You can cancel your AD at any time you have capacity.  Once you have been found to be incapacitated and your AD is turned on, you are not able to cancel your AD until you regain capacity.


You can cancel your AD by doing one of three things:

  1. By writing a signed and dated statement indicating that you are revoking your AD
  2. By physically destroying your AD, or directing someone to destroy your AD in your presence
  3. By stating out loud that you are revoking your AD


If you revoke your Advance Directive, it is very important that you let your doctors, agent, and loved ones know.  Physicians and agents cannot be held liable for following an Advance Directive that they believe to be correct and valid.


For more information on revoking your Advance Directive, please see Va. Code § 54.1-2985.